| FDU MFA Alum Risa Pappas Directs Someday You’ll Be My Wife
The MFA is a creative writing low residency program that combines 10-day residencies with on-line coursework.
Creative Writing and Literature for educators, Fairleigh Dickinson, Creative Writing,Teaneck, New Jersey, Master of Fine Arts in Writing,
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FDU MFA Alum Risa Pappas Directs Someday You’ll Be My Wife

FDU MFA Alum Risa Pappas Directs Someday You’ll Be My Wife

Official Selection

2016 New York City Independent Film Festival

Press contact: Audrey Lorea
E: audreythweatt@gmail.com ★ P: 347.633.4966

Watch the TRAILER

Someday You’ll Be My Wife

Synopsis: A nonstop, 9-minute joyride with Tigerman, New Jersey’s silliest and spookiest band.

Risa
Risa Pappas Biography

Risa is a writer and freelance editor. She graduated with an MFA in Creative Writing from Fairleigh Dickinson University in 2013 and is co-owner of production company Killer Goose Films, LLC. Poetry and screenwriting are her passions. She loves professional wrestling, mixed martial arts, contemplating the infinite and drinking white teas. Her hair color changes as often as her mood, but most of the time she can be found cracking wise or writing quietly and seriously on her couch. She lives in northern New Jersey and has a dead pet dog named Thirsty.
 
 
 
tigerman
Tigerman Biography
Tigerman is a highly improvised, mostly instrumental product of the diverse music backgrounds of its members who met while studying music at William Paterson University. Consisting of Adam Carelli on alto and tenor sax, Jay Gogel on keys, Kurt Althoff on guitar, Joe Stracquatanio on bass and Rory Burns on drums, Tigerman’s sound blends elements of funk, jazz, rock and the bizarre into the unique blend of groovy jams and epic aural journeys. These five musicians possess the musical strength, speed, agility and ferocity of a tiger in its most primal state. Since their formation in 2011, Tigerman has played many shows across the North East and released several EP’s.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why did you make this short film?
I had this urgent desire to create something, but I didn’t know where to focus my energy. My company, Killer Goose Films, has shot five other short films and released four of them by one of us as individual directors. I felt as though it was my time to add to our catalog of amazing shorts. I knew Tigerman’s music and I knew their songs were long, so I thought that might give me the creative outlet I needed to make something of significance. I wanted to do something wild and strange. I didn’t want an easily-discernible narrative.

What was it like working with Tigerman?
I’ve known Adam Carelli as the funniest guy around for years, so when he began performing in Tigerman, I knew the rest of the guys had to be pretty great. I wasn’t wrong. I invited myself to one of their band practices, sat them down, and proposed making them a video. From there we had a very stream-of-consciousness brainstorming session, and I accepted just about every idea tossed out, including my own. Every subsequent interaction with them had that exact same magic. The whole process felt creative but more importantly, collaborative. They trusted me with directing and I quickly grew to trust them to perform. In every situation they found themselves in on my behalf, they proved to be incredibly good sports.

What did you learn about directing?
Being that the word “micro” as description of our budget isn’t even an adequate representation, I had to learn to make something out of basically nothing. There is a vast difference between knowing something and experiencing that knowledge in practice. I always knew the proverb that “necessity is the mother of invention,” but I truly experienced and internalized it when making this film. It had to get done, and I had to do it. And I did.

Is this the future of music videos?
I think music videos will be around for a long time, because YouTube and the like are very easy to use to access an artist’s music. Music videos are an extra opportunity to represent the artist, visually as well as aurally. But music short films are emerging now as a separate art form, and they give creators like me the breathing room to do some extraordinary things, while still germinating ultimately from the music of these artists as their primary driving force. A music video is great, but a short film can reach out so much further. I would love to make another sometime.

Are you interested in studying with Fairleigh Dickinson University’s Low Residency MFA program?
Learn more.

27 Apr 2016 no comments